Quick Answer: Can You Get Sick From Using Someone’S Toothbrush?

Can you get sick from using someone else’s toothbrush?

You risk a number of infections when you choose to pick up someone else’s toothbrush.

Viruses, including herpes simplex type one, are just one example of toothbrush-spread diseases.

Herpes simplex type one is the very same virus that causes oral and genital herpes..

What diseases can you get from sharing a toothbrush?

Similarly, many people bleed when they brush their teeth. In other words, if you share your toothbrush, you could also be sharing blood and saliva as well. This can be a serious issue because you could be exposing yourself to blood borne viruses such as herpes and hepatitis.

How long do germs live on toothbrush?

“While flu viruses may survive on toothbrushes for up to three days after first exposure, you don’t have to throw out your toothbrush just because you’ve been sick.” Desai said as long as they’re your own germs, you don’t have to worry.

What happens if you use the same toothbrush for too long?

If you keep using an old toothbrush, it is less effective at cleaning plaque off of your teeth and at the gumline. That much is obvious, because it’s easy to see the bristles begin to bend out of shape.

Can kissing cause gum disease?

You’re unlikely to get gingivitis through kissing, but people who have poor oral health may be more susceptible to the exchange of bacteria during kissing. This exposure (combined with poor oral health) may lead to gingivitis.

Should you share a toothbrush with your spouse?

Dr Frick says “it’s probably a good point” that toothbrush sharing isn’t much different to kissing, but says “if your partner catches a viral infection, the shared toothbrush may be responsible for the transmission of the virus to you”. “It’s a better idea to have your own toothbrush. It’s low risk.”

What do you do if someone uses your toothbrush?

A toothbrush will harbor food particles that the naked eye cannot see, allowing bacteria and viruses to proliferate. So stop sharing your toothbrush with anyone. If you accidentally use another person’s toothbrush, grab some strong mouthwash and rinse with it immediately. This will help minimize or negate the exposure.

What happens if you use someone elses toothbrush?

When you use someone else’s toothbrush, you expose your teeth and gums to new bacteria which may not react well with your existing bacteria. This foreign bacteria can increase your risk of catching a cold, the flu, or other germs lurking on your partner’s toothbrush, even if they practice good hygiene.

Is sharing a toothbrush the same as kissing?

“Sharing a toothbrush is probably about the same as kissing,” says Ryder, when asked about the risks of swapping infections. “The difference with a kiss is that you’re transmitting saliva, too, so the bacteria may be able to survive a little better in that saliva.”

How do I sanitize a toothbrush?

Rinse the bristles thoroughly in water after brushing. Place some antiseptic mouthwash or 3% hydrogen peroxide into a small cup, enough to cover the toothbrush. Soak for about 15 minutes — any longer risks damaging the bristles. Rinse thoroughly with water before using again.

Why is it wrong to share toothbrushes?

“This is because brushing sometimes causes the gums to bleed, which exposes everyone you share your toothbrush with to blood stream diseases. This means that by sharing a toothbrush, you could also be sharing blood, which is a lot riskier than just swapping saliva.

How do you clean a used toothbrush?

Dissolve 2 teaspoons of baking soda in a cup of water and soak the toothbrush in the solution. Dilute 1 teaspoon of 3 percent strength hydrogen peroxide in 1 cup of water and swish the toothbrush bristles in the solution before brushing. Soak the bristles in vinegar overnight once per week.